Respite Care for Caregivers

elderly man sitting on bench alone resting

Written by:

Jeffrey Grossman

Published:

November 21, 2019


Do you need a break? Respite care provides short-term relief to primary caregivers from the constant care they provide to elderly adults in need of assistance.

 

What is Respite Care?

Primary caregivers serve, serve, and serve some more. Caregiving is not only a physically demanding job but can be emotionally draining as well. Constantly caring for an older adult with a disability, health condition, or who is generally dependant on others is exhausting.

Caregiving is a calling, as we say at Commonwise Home Care, but it’s not for the faint of heart. Some people fall into caregiving unexpectedly due to the rapid health decline of a loved one and need support. Respite care relieves a primary caregiver from their daily duties by providing another caregiver to step in and care for a short period of time.

 

Who provides care?

Respite care can be provided by a friend, family member, neighbor, or professional. Having said that, being on call for those who are not proficient at caregiving is not a restful day away. An experienced caregiver will add the most value to both the patient and the primary caregiver.

 

Where do they provide care?

Care can be provided in-home or at an adult day care center. Patients with Dementia may find it difficult to acclimate to a new environment, so in home care is usually preferable. In home care provided by a professional caregiver offers the best of both worlds: trained help in the comfort of your loved one’s home.

 

How long is the care help provided?

In-home respite care is a short-term care service. Depending on the situation, respite care can be offered on an as-needed basis for a few hours or days at a time. The break provided by respite care gives primary caregivers the opportunity to run errands or simply take a personal day to rest and reset.

 

Family Caregiver Support

Family members are the true heroes of caregiving but can burn out quickly; some days they just need a break. When family caregivers are daily supporting the needs of a loved one, they may feel guilty having someone else step in.

If you are a family caregiver, concerns around respite care may start to pile up:

  • What will a new caregiver do if X or Y happens?
  • I’m responsible and can’t leave care up to someone else.
  • No one knows how to care for my loved one in the ways that I do.

The list goes on, but taking a break from caregiving is normal and a crucial part of self-care. Family caregivers deserve a break in the same way those with other full-time jobs take lunch breaks and vacation days. The burden of caregiving is weighty for a family to share, let alone one individual. Professional caregivers can help ease these concerns with their care experience and expertise. 

Remember that respite care is just as much for the care recipient as it is for the caregiver. A new face provides an opportunity for your loved one to experience more social interaction. Plus, it can be healthy for a new pair of eyes to provide care with a fresh perspective. Prevent caregiver burnout with respite care.

 

Respite Care by Professional Caregivers

At Commonwise Home Care, our professional caregivers provide a variety of care services for aging adults. Respite care is an essential service we offer to support primary caregivers. In home care includes a range of services from companionship and personal care to skilled nurse care, such as medication management.

We believe caregiving is a calling. Our caregivers are trained in both hard and soft skills, so they are prepared to care both practically and relationally. Senior care is available to support your loved one and give you the confidence you have been looking for in a caregiver. 

Whether you need a break for a few hours to run errands, or a full day off to rest and reset, we are at your service 24/7. For more information on the Commonwise Home Care difference, call 434.202.8565.

Disclaimer: Please check with your physician before making any changes to your diet, exercise, or medication routine.

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